What a 4-year-old Taught Me About Writing

Published August 28, 2013 by Kimberly Michelle Scott

In a society where more is more, I was shocked to learn a lesson about “less is sufficient” from my four year old daughter. From birth she has been the model in so many pictures. At age two, I decided to enter her into her first pageant. She won for her state and went on to win a supreme title. When it was time for her photo shoot, she adamantly refused to put on her dress and photograph. Finally, after lots of coaxing, I made a deal with her that if she took the set of photos, I would withdraw her from pageants; I would not ask her to do another. Time passed, and she slowly seemed to show interest in getting back in the pageant scene. I asked her about a local pageant, she seemed excited, so I thought it was a go. However, as time drew nearer to the date of the pageant, my little girl seemed anxious. I asked her, “Acacia’ do you want to do the pageant and get the crown?” Acacia`, with her head full of reasoning wise beyond her years, looked at me and said, “I have mine. I don’t need all of them.” As a highly competitive graduate student and ambitious author and educator, I am often thrown into so many directions, I am swallowed by stress. Most of the time, nothing in my work life gets my full attention, because I am striving to complete so much. I know that a lesson I need to learn is what is for me is for me, and if I concentrate fully on venture at a time, I will have what I need to succeed. However, I recently learned the best lesson about opportunities from a four year old: When it comes to opportunities, I don’t need all of them. So as you rush to get the next poem, short story, or kindle book in, apply that to your writing life. Among the literary greats are Harper Lee, Ralph Ellison, Margaret Mitchell, Emily Bronte`, and Oscar Wilde. One thing they have in common is that they have only written one book! Quality is so much better than quantity.

Advertisements

2 comments on “What a 4-year-old Taught Me About Writing

  • Leave a Reply

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

    Connecting to %s

    %d bloggers like this: